The Clientele – Discography (2000-2007) [FLAC]

The Clientele - Discography (2000-2007) [FLAC] Download

Artist: The Clientele
Album: Discography
Genre: Indie
Year: 2000-2007
Size: ~ 1.25 Gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Retrofitted pop band the Clientele had obvious roots in the hazy, autumnal glare of Galaxie 500 and Felt. Just as those bands took their Velvet Underground and Television records to heart without being derivative, the Clientele were able to chalk up an extensive discography riddled with lush melodies of their own without sounding like a tribute band. Think of your favorite ’60s pop band and odds are they’re in the Clientele’s blood.

A Fading Summer The London-based band formed in mid-1997, consisting of Alasdair MacLean (guitar and vocals), Innes Phillips (guitar and vocals), James Hornsey (bass), and Howard (drums). Mark Keen replaced the academically occupied Howard toward the end of 1999; Phillips left early on to form the Relict, a group with a varied membership that has occasionally included Clientele members. After debuting on the Fierce Panda label’s Cry Me a Liver compilation, the Clientele released a slew of singles, compilation contributions, and EPs in short order. Most significantly, March released A Fading Summer in 2000, an EP that harvested some of the band’s hard-to-find singles and a couple new recordings. Later that year, the full-length Suburban Light (another compilation of previously recorded material) was issued by Pointy.
Lost Weekend The band hooked up with Merge in early 2001, which issued Suburban Light in the U.S. months later. The Lost Weekend EP came out on Acuarela in 2002, which was followed a year later by their first proper album and Merge debut, The Violet Hour. Strange Geometry arrived in 2005, and in 2006 the band added keyboardist/violinist/percussionist Mel Draisey to its ranks. God Save the Clientele, which featured production by Mark Nevers of the band’s U.S. labelmates Lambchop, was released in spring 2007. Bonfires on the Heath, another release for Merge, was issued during fall 2009. The Minotaur EP, which followed in August of 2010, was made up of songs recorded during the sessions for Bonfires on the Heath.
Despite the Clientele’s claims of giving up touring after their worldwide jaunt promoting Bonfires, they returned to the U.S. for live dates after the EP’s release. Soon after these dates, however, the group members announced they were going on indefinite hiatus. MacLean formed a new band called Amor de Dias, and the rest went their separate ways until re-forming (minus Draisey) to play a one-off show in 2013 at the Pop Revo festival in Denmark. Things remained quiet on the recording front, and the band surprised many fans by scheduling a U.S. tour in early 2014 to coincide with Merge’s 25th birthday festivities and the deluxe reissue of Suburban Light. The release of the career retrospective Alone and Unreal: the Best of The Clientele in September of 2015 provided the band another excuse to play a live show, while MacLean set fans hearts a flutter by sharing the news in an interview that the band had one side of a new album finished. – Artist Biography by Andy Kellman

Read More

The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band – Albums Collection (2006-2012) [FLAC]

The Reverend Peyton's Big Damn Band - Albums Collection (2006-2012) [FLAC] Download

Artist: The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band
Album: Albums Collection
Genre: Blues
Year: 2006-2012
Size: ~ 1.58 Gb
Source: CDs
Format: WavPack / FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

While they’re only a trio, the Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band deliver a sound that lives up to their name, with thick, bass-heavy, blues-based guitar figures and growling vocals accompanied by muscular but minimal drumming and the metallic percussive scratch of a washboard (making them one of the first rock bands to regularly feature the latter instrument since Black Oak Arkansas). The group was formed by guitarist and singer Josh “Reverend” Peyton, who was born and raised in Indiana, and first exposed to music through his father’s record collection, which was heavy on Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, and Bob Dylan, all artists with their own take on the blues. When Josh was 12 years old, his dad gave him a Kay guitar, and once he grew to know his way around the instrument, he got an amp to go along with it. With his brother Jayme Peyton on drums and a mutual friend on bass, Josh formed his first band, Drive-Thru, and began playing parties and dances as Josh developed a greater passion for vintage blues, ranging from electric blues icons like Muddy Waters and B.B. King to country-blues artists such as Bukka White and Charley Patton. Not long after finishing high school, Josh broke up Drive-Thru after developing a severe case of tendonitis that made it extremely painful for him to play the guitar. However, after a year working as a hotel desk clerk, doctors at the Indiana Hand Center were able to perform surgery that allowed him to play the guitar again, and around the same time, he met a woman named Breezy, who shared his love of the blues. The two fell in love and eventually married; they decided to form a band, with Josh on guitar and vocals, and Breezy on vocals and washboard. Jayme Peyton rounded out the group on drums, and the Big Damn Band was born. The group hit the road hard — they play up to 250 dates a year — and in 2004 cut their first album, The Pork n’ Beans Collection, which they self-released, selling thousands of copies at the merch table at their shows. After two more self-released albums (2006’s Big Damn Nation and 2007’s The Gospel Album), Peyton’s Big Damn Band struck a deal with Side One Dummy, a punk label with a fondness for aggressive roots music, and 2008’s The Whole Fam Damily was their first release for the label. In late 2009, Jayme Peyton left the Big Damn Band, and Aaron “Cuz” Persinger took over the group’s makeshift drum kit (complete with a modified bucket). Two more albums for Side One Dummy followed (2011’s Peyton on Patton, with the group covering the songs of blues legend Charley Patton, and 2012’s Between the Ditches) before Persinger left the Big Damn Band and Ben “Bird Dog” Bussell signed on as drummer in 2013. In 2014, the Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band signed a new record deal with the relaunched blues label Yazoo Records; their first release for the company, So Delicious, dropped in January 2015. – Artist Biography by Mark Deming

Read More

Hurricane Ruth – Discography (2011-2017) [FLAC]

Hurricane Ruth - Discography (2011-2017) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Hurricane Ruth
Album: Discography
Genre: Blues
Year: 2011-2017
Size: ~ 1.31 Gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

“Hurricane Ruth LaMaster is a musical force of nature. She takes the soul and the energy of the greats who came before her and combines them into her own brand of blues that grabs you and doesn’t let go until well after the records are finished playing.” — Dave Tomlinson — Preserving the Blues

Read More

Blue Cheer – Oh! Pleasant Hope [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1971) [CD FLAC]

Blue Cheer - Oh! Pleasant Hope [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1971) [CD FLAC] Download

Artist: Blue Cheer
Album: Oh! Pleasant Hope [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017]
Genre: Rock
Year: 1971
Size: ~ 350 mb
Source: CD
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

It’s hard to imagine what would prompt someone to suggest the band that recorded Vincebus Eruptum should get in touch with their pastoral side, but for their sixth album in only four years, Blue Cheer decided to explore something close to folk-rock and they sounded a lot more comfortable with the stuff than anyone had a right to expect. 1971’s Oh! Pleasant Hope featured the same lineup as the previous year’s The Original Human Being (the first time since Outsideinside that the band had the same musicians for two albums in a row), and while the previous album found Blue Cheer trying to buff off some of their rough edges, this one is loose, laid-back, and playful; if it doesn’t hit very hard, it’s one of the most organic and natural-sounding recordings to carry the group’s name. The album opens with “Hiway Man,” an updated variant on old folk ballads with acoustic guitars and a magisterial organ dominating the arrangement; Oh! Pleasant Hope upends traditional expectations about this most heavy band, and while their tough, blues-centered rock is still present on songs like “Believer” and “Heart Full of Soul” (not the Yardbirds hit but a Dickie Peterson original), most of the time the music is simpler and quieter, and “Traveling Man,” “Money Troubles,” and “Ecological Blues” come off like jams cut live in the studio rather than stuff the group labored over for days. And the band flies their freak flag high on the tale of a mythic, mean-spirited cop “Lester the Arrester” and the title track, a likably goofy singalong in which a guy looking for reefer in the midst of a cannabis drought imagines a day when “grass will flow like wine.” Oh! Pleasant Hope was recorded at a time when Blue Cheer’s fortunes were at a low ebb, and it was the last album they would cut before breaking up for several years; it’s hard to imagine anyone thought this was a shrewd commercial move, and at heart, this is an album Blue Cheer made because they felt like doing this, and the relaxed attitude and sense of fun is what makes this album work. – AllMusic Review by Mark Deming

Read More

Blue Cheer – Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC]

Blue Cheer - Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC] Download

Artist: Blue Cheer
Album: Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017]
Genre: Rock
Year: 1970
Size: ~ 382 mb
Source: CD
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

After working with two monstrously loud guitar heroes, Leigh Stephens and Randy Holden, Blue Cheer wanted to pursue a more subtle musical direction, and on their fourth album, simply titled Blue Cheer, they followed the path of the first half of 1969’s New! Improved! Blue Cheer, featuring guitarist Bruce Stephens and keyboard man Ralph Burns Kellogg, instead of the power trio format they pioneered on their first two albums and the second half of New! Improved! with Holden. Drummer Paul Whaley had also dropped out of the band by album number four, with Norman Mayell taking over the traps and leaving bassist and singer Dickie Peterson as the only original member of Blue Cheer, all within two years of the release of Vincebus Eruptum. Given all these changes, it’s no wonder Blue Cheer sounds so much different than they did on the band’s first two LP’s, but so long as you’re not expecting the monolithic power of their earliest stuff, it’s a fun album that generates an impressive groove. Blue Cheer’s music was always rooted in the blues, but here the approach is less mutated and more organic, with a touch of boogie in the rhythms and enough swagger to keep this from sounding like country-rock, even if the tone is more rootsy and significantly less punishing. The raspy twang of Peterson’s vocals shows a lighter, more graceful touch here, though he still sounds good and gritty, and the interplay between Kellogg’s piano and organ and Stephens’ guitar work suggests some improbable but effective cross between the Band and Steppenwolf. And while Peterson didn’t contribute much to the songwriting on Blue Cheer, Stephens and Kellogg step up with some good tunes (as does Gary Yoder, who guests on two tunes and would join the group for album number five), and the cover of Delaney Bramlett’s “Hello L.A., Bye Bye Birmingham” is inspired. If Vincebus Eruptum and Outsideinside sounded like music for an acid-and-amphetamine-crazed Saturday night biker party, Blue Cheer is the stuff the same bikers would put on for a Sunday beer-and-weed cookout; it’s a more laid-back and relaxed effort, but it still rocks with a strong and steady roll. – AllMusic Review by Mark Deming

Read More