Jimmy Page – Albums Collection (1968-2011) [FLAC]

Jimmy Page - Albums Collection (1968-2011) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Jimmy Page
Album: Albums Collection
Genre: Rock
Year: 1968-2011
Size: ~ 10 gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC, APE, WavPack (tracks/image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Unquestionably one of the all-time most influential, important, and versatile guitarists and songwriters in rock history is Jimmy Page. Just about every rock guitarist from the late ’60s/early ’70s to the present day has been influenced by Page’s work with Led Zeppelin — his monolithic riffs served as a blueprint for what would eventually become heavy metal, yet he refused to be pigeonholed to any single musical style (touching upon folk, country, funk, blues, and other genres). Page also lent a hand in writing (or co-writing) Zeppelin’s vast array of classic songs and produced all their albums. Born on January 9, 1944, in Heston, Middlesex, England, Page picked up the guitar at age 13 after being inspired by the Elvis Presley tune “Baby Let’s Play House,” and while he took several lessons, was mostly self-taught. Instead of attending college right after high school, Page decided to join his first real rock band, Neil Christian & the Crusaders, whom he toured England with. But Page fell seriously ill (with glandular fever) and was forced to quit and recuperate. Dejected, Page pondered giving up music and focusing on another interest, painting, as he enrolled at an art college in Sutton, Surrey.

With the emergence of such bands as the Rolling Stones in the early ’60s and their gritty blues-rock, Page’s interest in music perked up once again — but instead of forming a band right away, he decided to hone his craft by becoming one of England’s top session guitarists and producers. Although the exact specifics of which sessions he was involved with have become hazy over time, it’s confirmed that he worked with many of the day’s top acts, including the Who, Them, Donovan, the Kinks, and the Rolling Stones, among others. By 1966, Page was looking to put his session work on hold and join a full-time band; he accepted an offer to play with the Yardbirds (initially as a bassist, then shortly thereafter as a guitarist), as he was paired up with another one of rock’s all-time guitar greats, Jeff Beck. Although the Yardbirds began as a straight-ahead blues-rock band, with the inclusion of Page in the lineup, the group began experimenting with psychedelic and hard rock styles.

Little Games Despite it being obvious that the Yardbirds were on the downside of their career (Beck left shortly after Page came onboard), Page appeared on the album Little Games and several tours before the band finally called it a day in 1968. With a string of tour dates still set up throughout Europe, Page decided to go through with the shows and put together a new band that was dubbed the New Yardbirds — including longtime session bassist John Paul Jones, plus newcomers Robert Plant on vocals and John Bonham on drums. After the completion of their initial tour, the band changed its name to Led Zeppelin and explored the still largely uncharted territory of hard rock/heavy metal. The band immediately became one of rock’s most successful and enduring bands, issuing a string of classic albums from 1969 through 1975 — Led Zeppelin I, Led Zeppelin II, Led Zeppelin III, Led Zeppelin IV, Houses of the Holy, and Physical Graffiti — which spawned such classic rock radio standards as “Dazed and Confused,” “Whole Lotta Love,” “Immigrant Song,” “Black Dog,” “Stairway to Heaven,” and “Kashmir,” as the band also became a must-see live act in the process. Page also found the time to work with folk artist Roy Harper (most notably his 1971 release, Stormcock, under the alias S. Flavius Mercurius). Zeppelin was arguably the biggest rock band in the world by the mid-’70s (their influence on other rock bands following in their wake cannot be stressed enough) as they launched their own record company, Swan Song, but it was around this time that Page began dabbling with heroin and other substances, eventually leading to him becoming a full-blown addict by the late ’70s/early ’80s (as a result, his playing began to suffer). Also, Page’s interest in the occult became a concern to those around him (he went as far as purchasing a mansion on the Loch Ness in Scotland that was once owned by renowned Satanist Aleister Crowley).
The Song Remains the SameZeppelin continued issuing albums until the dawn of the ’80s (1976’s concert movie/soundtrack The Song Remains the Same and Presence, 1979’s In Through the Out Door), but tragedy ultimately derailed the quartet — the death of Plant’s young son in 1977 and Bonham’s alcohol-related death in 1980. After Led Zeppelin decided to call it quits in late 1980, Page disappeared from sight (it became known later on that he hardly touched his instrument for a long time afterward). It wasn’t until 1982 that Page began to emerge from his self-imposed exile, as he composed and played on the motion picture soundtrack to Death Wish III, compiled the Zeppelin outtakes collection Coda, and took part in the 1983 star-studded A.R.M.S. tour, which saw Page unite with Beck and Eric Clapton for a series of shows that raised money for multiple sclerosis research. In 1984, Page guested alongside Plant, Beck, and Nile Rodgers on the hit EP of rock & roll oldies The Honeydrippers, and formed his first band since the demise of Zeppelin, dubbed the Firm. The group featured former Free/Bad Company vocalist Paul Rodgers, and despite the fact that their self-titled debut was a sizable hit, the band decided to call it a day shortly after the release of its lukewarm-received sophomore effort, Mean Business.
Now & ZenLed Zeppelin fans were given a rare treat when Zeppelin’s surviving three members reunited (with drummers Tony Thompson and Phil Collins) for the mammoth Live Aid at Philadelphia’s JFK Stadium in July 1985 — unfortunately handing in an incredibly under-rehearsed, sloppy performance. Zeppelin reunited again in 1988 for the Atlantic Records 25th anniversary concert at New York’s Madison Square Garden (this time Bonham’s son, Jason, filled in for his late father behind the kit), and yet again performed another mistake-filled mini set. The same year Page guested on Plant’s solo release Now & Zen, as well as issuing his first ever solo recording, Outrider, following it up with a tour that touched upon tracks from all eras of his career. By the early ’90s, further rumors of an impending Zeppelin reunion continued to circulate, and after Plant declined an invitation from Page to join forces once again, Page decided to collaborate with former Deep Purple/Whitesnake vocalist David Coverdale, whose vocal style was often compared to Plant’s over the years. Page’s latest project only lasted a single album, 1993’s heavily Zep-like Coverdale/Page, as a proposed world tour was scrapped in favor of just a few select dates in Japan.
No Quarter In 1994, Plant and Page finally agreed to collaborate once again (although Jones wasn’t invited this time), leading to the release of the acoustic set No Quarter the same year, plus a highly popular MTV Unplugged special and sold-out world tour. A year later, Led Zeppelin were inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, this being the second time a Page-related band got the nod from the Hall (in 1992, the Yardbirds were honored). The year 1998 saw Plant and Page issue an album of all-new material, Walking into Clarksdale, which was surprisingly not well received by the public, sinking from sight shortly after its release. The duo went their separate ways by the late ’90s, as Page joined the Black Crowes for a tour and live album (2000’s Live at the Greek). The same year as the album’s release, another Crowes/Page tour was cut short due to a back injury Page suffered. But in June of 2001, Page took to the concert stage alongside Plant to celebrate the 60th birthday of Roy Harper.
In 2005 Page was appointed Office of the Order of the British Empire in recognition of his charity work, and the following year he was inducted, along with the rest of Led Zeppelin, into the U.K. Music Hall of Fame. A one-off charity concert with all of the surviving Led Zeppelin members, with Jason Bonham on drums, occurred in 2007 at the O2 Arena in London, and in 2008 Page appeared in and co-produced the guitar documentary It Might Get Loud, which focused on the careers and playing styles of Page, Jack White, and U2’s the Edge. In 2012 Page, Plant, and Jones received the prestigious Kennedy Center Honors from President Barack Obama in a White House ceremony amidst rumors circulating about a possible Led Zeppelin reunion in anticipation of the forthcoming deluxe reissues of the band’s first three studio albums. By 2014 those rumors had mostly abated, and Page announced that he was going to put together a band and tour as a solo act for the first time since 1988. – Artist Biography by Greg Prato

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Motionless In White – Discography (2007-2014) [FLAC]

Motionless In White - Discography (2007-2014) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Motionless In White
Album: Discography
Genre: Metal
Year: 2007-2014
Size: ~ 2.42 gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC (tracks + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Motionless in White, often abbreviated MIW, is a metalcore band from Scranton, Pennsylvania. Formed in 2005, the band consists of Chris “Motionless” Cerulli (lead vocals), Ricky “Horror” Olson (rhythm guitar), Devin “Ghost” Sola (bass), Ryan Sitkowski (lead guitar), and Vinny Mauro (drums). The band has stated that their band name derived from the Eighteen Visions song “Motionless and White”.

Motionless in White was signed to Fearless Records for their first three studio albums; their most recent, Reincarnate, was released on September 15, 2014 in United Kingdom and then on September 16, 2014 worldwide.

In July 2016, the band signed to Roadrunner Records, achieving their lifelong dream of signing with the company.

In October 2016, the band announced that they will be releasing their new album, Graveyard Shift, in early 2017. In January 2017, the band announced a new single “Eternally Yours”, along with the release date for the record, which is May 5, 2017. On 3rd March the band released the album’s track list and album art, followed by the release of their new single, “Loud (F*ck It).

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Sister Sin – Discography (2003-2014) [FLAC]

Sister Sin - Discography (2003-2014) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Sister Sin
Album: Discography
Genre: Metal
Year: 2003-2014
Size: ~ 1.79 gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Female-fronted, Gothenburg, Sweden-based rockers Sister Sin offer up hard-hitting, old-school metal that invokes names like Warlock, W.A.S.P., Hanoi Rocks, and Motrhead, as well as more contemporary yet no less vintage-sounding outfits like Spiders, Graveyard, and Hardcore Superstar. Formed in 2002 and fronted by the fierce and charismatic Liv “Sin” Jagrell, the band issued its debut album, Dance of the Wicked, in 2003 (it was reissued in 2013). In 2008, after a series of lineup changes, the group dropped the well-received Victory Records-issued Switchblade Serenades and embarked on a series of international tours. Staying with Victory and settling on the core lineup of Jagrell (vocals), Jimmy Hiltula (guitar), Dave Sundberg (drums), and Strandh (bass), their third long-player, True Sound of the Underground, arrived in 2010, followed by Now and Forever (2012) and the Rikard Lofgren and Gustav Ydenius-produced Black Lotus in 2014. – Artist Biography by James Christopher Monger

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Jamiroquai – Discography (1993-2017) [FLAC]

Jamiroquai - Discography (1993-2017) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Jamiroquai
Album: Discography
Genre: Electronic
Year: 1993-2017
Size: ~ 9.88 gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC (tracks + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Active since the early ’90s, Jamiroquai have amassed a steady stream of hits in their native U.K. and experienced chart success in just about every other area of the world, with an irresistible blend of house rhythms and ’70s-era soul/funk (the latter, especially, leading early on to claims of Stevie Wonder imitations). The band has gone through several lineup changes during its career, but through it all, their leader has remained singer/songwriter Jason Kay (aka J.K.). Born on December 30, 1969, in Stretford, Manchester, Kay’s mother, Karen, was a jazz singer who regularly performed at nightclubs, and in the ’70s had her own TV show. After leaving home at the age of 15, Kay found himself homeless and in trouble with the law (by committing petty crimes to get by). After a near-death experience (where he was attacked and stabbed) and being arrested for a crime he did not commit, Kay decided to return home, where he chose to pursue a legitimate career over crime: music. Kay didn’t have a band to back up his compositions, but he quickly came up with his future project’s name, Jamiroquai, a name that combined the name of a Native American tribe (the Iroquois) along with the music-based word, jam.

Emergency on Planet EarthKay’s home demos caught the attention of the record label Acid Jazz, which issued Jamiroquai’s debut single “When You Gonna Learn?” in late 1992. With Kay enlisting the help of others (Jamiroquai’s best-known lineup included drummer Derrick McKenzie, keyboard player Toby Smith, bassist Stuart Zender, and vibraphonist Wallis Buchanan), the single was a success and was soon followed by a long-term and lucrative recording contract with Sony. Jamiroquai’s full-length debut, Emergency on Planet Earth, followed in 1993 and became a major hit in their native England (peaking at number one on the charts), spawning such Top Ten hit singles as “Too Young to Die” and “Blow Your Mind.” The band’s second release, The Return of the Space Cowboy in 1995, managed to steer Jamiroquai clear of the sophomore jinx that affects so many up-and-coming bands by out-selling its predecessor in Europe and was a sizeable hit in Japan, as well.
With most of the world dancing to Jamiroquai’s beat, America was next in line for the band’s third effort, 1996’s Traveling Without Moving. The album spawned the worldwide hit “Virtual Insanity,” for which an award-winning video was filmed and helped the album achieve platinum status in the States by the year’s end (as well as a highlighted performance at the 1997 MTV Video Music Awards). Despite achieving breakthrough success, bassist Zender opted to leave the group during sessions for its follow-up, which resulted in Kay scrapping almost an entire album’s worth of new tracks in order to start from scratch with a new bassist (the slot would eventually go to newcomer Nick Fyffe). During the downtime, Jamiroquai contributed a brand-new track, “Deeper Underground,” to the soundtrack for the 1998 movie Godzilla.

Synkronized But the long wait between albums seemed to kill Jamiroquai’s momentum in the U.S. slackened when 1999’s Synkronized was largely ignored (although back home and across the globe, it was another major commercial success). Subsequently, it appeared as though the majority of Jamiroquai’s U.S. media attention focused on non-music-related events, such as the band turning down a million-dollar offer to play at a concert on New Year’s Eve 1999, and when Kay was accused of assaulting a tabloid photographer (with the charges later being dropped).
A Funk Odyssey It didn’t take Jamiroquai as long the next time around to issue another album, with A Funk Odyssey hitting the racks two years later in 2001. Kay also helmed a volume in the mix-album series Late Night Tales. From there, Jamiroquai spent the next two years gathering material for a sixth studio album. Dynamite, which was finally released in 2005, was written and recorded in Spain, Italy, Costa Rica, Scotland, New York, Los Angeles, and Jamiroquai’s own Buckinghamshire studio. The group’s seventh studio album, 2010’s Rock Dust Light Star, dutifully blended the disco and electronic leanings of 2005’s Dynamite with the organic, roots-based soul of the band’s 1993 debut.
Automaton In 2013, Jamiroquai marked their 20th Anniversary by reissuing remastered versions of their first three albums. Also around this time, they announced they had begun work on a new album and staged several short European tours. In 2017, they returned with their eighth studio album, Automaton, featuring the singles “Automaton” and “Cloud 9.” Produced by Kay along with keyboardist Matt Johnson, the album found the band exploring the themes of rising technology and the deterioration of human interaction, albeit with all of the electro-funky trappings that Jamiroquai have become so well known for. – Artist Biography by Greg Prato

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EZ3kiel – Albums Collection (1998-2016) [FLAC]

EZ3kiel - Albums Collection (1998-2016) [FLAC] Download

Artist: EZ3kiel
Album: Albums Collection
Genre: Electronic
Year: 1998-2016
Size: ~ 4.01 gb
Source: CDs, Digital download
Format: FLAC (tracks + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Ezekiel stylized as EZ3kiel is a French musical group formed in 1993 originating from La Riche, Tours, France. It now consists of three members Joan Guillon (main songwriter and guitarist), Yann Nguema (former bassist in charge of visual and interactive aspect) and Stphane Babiaud (training percussionist, multi-instrumentalist and arranger). Matthieu Fays (drummer), a founder of EZ3kiel withdrew from the group in May 2012 after twenty years of collaboration.

Vocalist Brigitte Amdom and guitarist Florent Duytschaever participated in the project during its first years of existence (1994-1999). Stphane Babiaud joined the group in 2007 after recording the album Naphtaline to which he actively participated. The band has been involved in parallel projects, classical music project Naphtaline Orchestra, exhibitions notably Les Mcaniques Potiques d’EZ3kiel, theatrical, poetic and musical collaborations with a great number of independent artists.

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Blue Cheer – Oh! Pleasant Hope [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1971) [CD FLAC]

Blue Cheer - Oh! Pleasant Hope [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1971) [CD FLAC] Download

Artist: Blue Cheer
Album: Oh! Pleasant Hope [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017]
Genre: Rock
Year: 1971
Size: ~ 350 mb
Source: CD
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

It’s hard to imagine what would prompt someone to suggest the band that recorded Vincebus Eruptum should get in touch with their pastoral side, but for their sixth album in only four years, Blue Cheer decided to explore something close to folk-rock and they sounded a lot more comfortable with the stuff than anyone had a right to expect. 1971’s Oh! Pleasant Hope featured the same lineup as the previous year’s The Original Human Being (the first time since Outsideinside that the band had the same musicians for two albums in a row), and while the previous album found Blue Cheer trying to buff off some of their rough edges, this one is loose, laid-back, and playful; if it doesn’t hit very hard, it’s one of the most organic and natural-sounding recordings to carry the group’s name. The album opens with “Hiway Man,” an updated variant on old folk ballads with acoustic guitars and a magisterial organ dominating the arrangement; Oh! Pleasant Hope upends traditional expectations about this most heavy band, and while their tough, blues-centered rock is still present on songs like “Believer” and “Heart Full of Soul” (not the Yardbirds hit but a Dickie Peterson original), most of the time the music is simpler and quieter, and “Traveling Man,” “Money Troubles,” and “Ecological Blues” come off like jams cut live in the studio rather than stuff the group labored over for days. And the band flies their freak flag high on the tale of a mythic, mean-spirited cop “Lester the Arrester” and the title track, a likably goofy singalong in which a guy looking for reefer in the midst of a cannabis drought imagines a day when “grass will flow like wine.” Oh! Pleasant Hope was recorded at a time when Blue Cheer’s fortunes were at a low ebb, and it was the last album they would cut before breaking up for several years; it’s hard to imagine anyone thought this was a shrewd commercial move, and at heart, this is an album Blue Cheer made because they felt like doing this, and the relaxed attitude and sense of fun is what makes this album work. – AllMusic Review by Mark Deming

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Blue Cheer – Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC]

Blue Cheer - Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC] Download

Artist: Blue Cheer
Album: Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017]
Genre: Rock
Year: 1970
Size: ~ 382 mb
Source: CD
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

After working with two monstrously loud guitar heroes, Leigh Stephens and Randy Holden, Blue Cheer wanted to pursue a more subtle musical direction, and on their fourth album, simply titled Blue Cheer, they followed the path of the first half of 1969’s New! Improved! Blue Cheer, featuring guitarist Bruce Stephens and keyboard man Ralph Burns Kellogg, instead of the power trio format they pioneered on their first two albums and the second half of New! Improved! with Holden. Drummer Paul Whaley had also dropped out of the band by album number four, with Norman Mayell taking over the traps and leaving bassist and singer Dickie Peterson as the only original member of Blue Cheer, all within two years of the release of Vincebus Eruptum. Given all these changes, it’s no wonder Blue Cheer sounds so much different than they did on the band’s first two LP’s, but so long as you’re not expecting the monolithic power of their earliest stuff, it’s a fun album that generates an impressive groove. Blue Cheer’s music was always rooted in the blues, but here the approach is less mutated and more organic, with a touch of boogie in the rhythms and enough swagger to keep this from sounding like country-rock, even if the tone is more rootsy and significantly less punishing. The raspy twang of Peterson’s vocals shows a lighter, more graceful touch here, though he still sounds good and gritty, and the interplay between Kellogg’s piano and organ and Stephens’ guitar work suggests some improbable but effective cross between the Band and Steppenwolf. And while Peterson didn’t contribute much to the songwriting on Blue Cheer, Stephens and Kellogg step up with some good tunes (as does Gary Yoder, who guests on two tunes and would join the group for album number five), and the cover of Delaney Bramlett’s “Hello L.A., Bye Bye Birmingham” is inspired. If Vincebus Eruptum and Outsideinside sounded like music for an acid-and-amphetamine-crazed Saturday night biker party, Blue Cheer is the stuff the same bikers would put on for a Sunday beer-and-weed cookout; it’s a more laid-back and relaxed effort, but it still rocks with a strong and steady roll. – AllMusic Review by Mark Deming

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Blue Cheer – Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC]

Blue Cheer - Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC] Download

Artist: Blue Cheer
Album: Blue Cheer [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017]
Genre: Rock
Year: 1970
Size: ~ 382 mb
Source: CD
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

After working with two monstrously loud guitar heroes, Leigh Stephens and Randy Holden, Blue Cheer wanted to pursue a more subtle musical direction, and on their fourth album, simply titled Blue Cheer, they followed the path of the first half of 1969’s New! Improved! Blue Cheer, featuring guitarist Bruce Stephens and keyboard man Ralph Burns Kellogg, instead of the power trio format they pioneered on their first two albums and the second half of New! Improved! with Holden. Drummer Paul Whaley had also dropped out of the band by album number four, with Norman Mayell taking over the traps and leaving bassist and singer Dickie Peterson as the only original member of Blue Cheer, all within two years of the release of Vincebus Eruptum. Given all these changes, it’s no wonder Blue Cheer sounds so much different than they did on the band’s first two LP’s, but so long as you’re not expecting the monolithic power of their earliest stuff, it’s a fun album that generates an impressive groove. Blue Cheer’s music was always rooted in the blues, but here the approach is less mutated and more organic, with a touch of boogie in the rhythms and enough swagger to keep this from sounding like country-rock, even if the tone is more rootsy and significantly less punishing. The raspy twang of Peterson’s vocals shows a lighter, more graceful touch here, though he still sounds good and gritty, and the interplay between Kellogg’s piano and organ and Stephens’ guitar work suggests some improbable but effective cross between the Band and Steppenwolf. And while Peterson didn’t contribute much to the songwriting on Blue Cheer, Stephens and Kellogg step up with some good tunes (as does Gary Yoder, who guests on two tunes and would join the group for album number five), and the cover of Delaney Bramlett’s “Hello L.A., Bye Bye Birmingham” is inspired. If Vincebus Eruptum and Outsideinside sounded like music for an acid-and-amphetamine-crazed Saturday night biker party, Blue Cheer is the stuff the same bikers would put on for a Sunday beer-and-weed cookout; it’s a more laid-back and relaxed effort, but it still rocks with a strong and steady roll. – AllMusic Review by Mark Deming

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Blue Cheer – BC #5 Original Human Being [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC]

Blue Cheer - BC #5 Original Human Being [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1970) [CD FLAC] Download

Artist: Blue Cheer
Album: BC #5 Original Human Being [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017]
Genre: Rock
Year: 1970
Size: ~ 416 mb
Source: CD
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Even after cleaning up their act considerably on their self-titled fourth album, Blue Cheer sound positively slick (at least by their standards) on 1970’s The Original Human Being. Though Dickie Peterson was still up front on bass and vocals, guitarist Bruce Stephens had left the group and Gary Yoder, who had contributed to Blue Cheer, came aboard on six-strings and vocals, while drummer Norman Mayell expanded his role, playing occasional keyboards, guitar, and even sitar as Blue Cheer belatedly embraced their Eastern influences on “Babaji (Twilight Raga).” A horn section was brought in for “Good Times Are So Hard to Find,” “Preacher,” and “Love of a Woman,” and Ralph Burns Kellogg’s keyboards take an even larger role in the arrangements. The Original Human Being is the most polished and professional album of Blue Cheer’s career, and there’s a lean but muscular proto-boogie groove that infuses most of the album’s 11 songs, and the performances sound tight and well-focused throughout. However, tightness isn’t what made Blue Cheer a memorable band in the first place, and the cleaner approach doesn’t always flatter this music. The Original Human Being is at its best when the group lets their rougher side show, such as on Peterson’s slow blues wail “Man on the Run,” Kellogg’s country-flavored lament “Tears in My Bed,” the mean-spirited “Black Sun,” and the loose-limbed and surprisingly funky “Sandwich.” Most of the time, The Original Human Being feels as if Blue Cheer were trying to build on the lessons learned from their fourth album, but while that record hit just the right note, this one reaches just a bit too far, and it’s most pleasing when the players forget trying to impress us and just go for what feels right. – AllMusic Review by Mark Deming

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Blue Cheer – New! Improved! [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1969) [CD FLAC]

Blue Cheer - New! Improved! [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017] (1969) [CD FLAC] Download

Artist: Blue Cheer
Album: New! Improved! [Mini LP SHM-CD Universal Japan 2017]
Genre: Rock
Year: 1969
Size: ~ 313 mb
Source: CD
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Guitarist Leigh Stephens quit Blue Cheer after touring in support of their second album, Outsideinside, but he may have been amused by the fact it took three men to replace him when the band cut their next LP. There are two different and distinct bands at work on New! Improved! Blue Cheer; on the album’s first six tunes, founding members Dickie Peterson (bass and vocals) and Paul Whaley (drums) are joined by Bruce Stephens on guitar and Ralph Burns Kellogg on keyboards, and this lineup bears little musical resemblance to the wildly over-amped power trio that cut Vincebus Eruptum less than two years before. This new edition of Blue Cheer was still strongly influenced by the blues, but the raw physical impact of the band had been significantly buffered, and Bruce Stephens’ rootsy guitar work was in a completely different league from the old band’s bone-crushing onslaught. The gentle country-rock of “As Long as I Live” and the dynamic, percussive boogie of “When It All Gets Old” would have been inconceivable coming from Blue Cheer Mk. One, and while the notion of comparing them brings to mind that old clich about apples and oranges, Peterson’s vocals do reveal a lot more nuance on these recordings, and Whaley’s more tightly controlled drumming gives the band a lean groove they didn’t have before. On side two, Blue Cheer return to power trio format with Randy Holden (formerly of the Other Half) on guitar, and while his style is also considerably different from Leigh Stephens’, his fondness for overwhelming volume and fierce, extended solos makes his contributions feel a lot more like the group’s formative work; Peterson and Whaley also sound a lot more like their old selves here, calling up a thunderous report to match Holden’s thick but graceful leads, and if Blue Cheer are a more subtle and artful band with Holden on guitar, his contributions suggest an evolution from the towering proto-metal of Vincebus Eruptum and Outsideinside, rather than the dramatic stylistic departure of the album’s first half. Unfortunately, the possibilities suggested by Holden’s material went unrealized when he quit the band shortly after making New! Improved! Blue Cheer; with him they might have made another album that, unlike this mixed bag, would have lived up to the boast of the title. – AllMusic Review by Mark Deming

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